Friday, July 24, 2009

Pediatric Heel Pain


What is Pediatric Heel Pain?

Heel pain is a symptom, not a disease. In other words, heel pain is a warning sign that a child has a condition that deserves attention. Heel pain problems in children are often associated with these signs and symptoms:


Pain in the back or bottom of the heel
Limping
Walking on toes
Difficulty participating in usual activities or sports

The most common cause of pediatric heel pain is a disorder called calcaneal apophysitis (see below), which usually affects 8- to 14-year olds. However, pediatric heel pain may be the sign of many other problems, and can occur at younger or older ages.


What is the Difference Between Pediatric and Adult Heel Pain?

Pediatric heel pain differs from the most common form of heel pain experienced by adults (plantar fasciitis) in the way pain occurs. Plantar fascia pain is intense when getting out of bed in the morning or after sitting for long periods, and then it subsides after walking around a bit. Pediatric heel pain usually doesn't improve in this manner. In fact, walking around typically makes the pain worse.
Heel pain is so common in children because of the very nature of their growing feet. In children, the heel bone (the calcaneus) is not yet fully developed until age 14 or older. Until then, new bone is forming at the growth plate (the apophysis), a weak area located at the back of the heel. Too much stress on the growth plate is the most common cause of pediatric heel pain.


Calcaneal apophysitis.

Also known as Sever's disease, this is the most common cause of heel pain in children. Although not a true "disease," it is an inflammation of the heel's growth plate due to muscle strain and repetitive stress, especially in those who are active or obese. This condition usually causes pain and tenderness in the back and bottom of the heel when walking, and the heel is painful when touched. It can occur in one or both feet.
Tendo-Achilles bursitis. This condition is an inflammation of the fluid-filled sac (bursa).
You can find more information about heel pain at www.vailfoot.com
If you are concerned that your child may be experiencing heel pain, please give the office a call to set up an appointment with Dr. Vail (419-423-1888).


1 comment:

  1. Did'nt know kids also suffer heel spur or heel pain.

    ReplyDelete

Happy Feet...

Happy Feet...

= Happy Kids...

= Happy Kids...

= Happy Family!

= Happy Family!